Boosting Creativity

We have written about walking in marinas to find fun photos, as we have many in the Pacific Northwest.  Most of the boats are pleasure boats, or in the case of The Center for Wooden Boats where I often walk, they are historical.  The other day I drove by Fishermen’s Terminal near Ballard, a large marina for fishing boats to dock and get ready for the summer fishing season.  I decided to explore.

Working Fishing Docks

Working Fishing Docks

My first visit to Fishermen’s Terminal was over six years ago when a good friend, Bob Ness, and his friend, who is a professional photographer, invited me to join them for a photo walk.  They had great gear, while I was using my Canon Powershot G10.  I felt a bit intimidated, but they reassured me that my camera was as effective as theirs.  They were kind, but I decided to take the opportunity to learn from these two great photographers.  I was surprised by their choice of the Fishermen’s Terminal, but that day I discovered the beauty of rust, metal and all that you can find in a fishing yard.

Shadows - Shot with Canon G10

Shadows – Shot with Canon G10

I learned about getting up close, such as in the photos above and below, to capture the shadows with the rust lines.  I actually have the top photo hanging in my office.  For a first time out I was pleased with my results.

A Closer View

A Closer View

My exploration continued during an Oregon Coast photo workshop given by Rick Sammon.  In addition to great landscape and seascape photo opportunities, we visited a fishing repair yard. It was fun capturing the colors, the designs, and the details that you can find in the ropes, floats, and wires that are used to repair fishing vessels.

Colors in Newport, Oregon

Colors in Newport, Oregon

Camera Walking through a fishing terminal, or an industrial site, can push your comfort zone and up your creativity.  I was feeling a need for more inspiration, but didn’t think it would come from a working fishing terminal, but I was wrong.  I spent over 90 minutes walking up and down the docks, talking briefly to the workers, and exploring interesting shots, such as reflections.

Bumper Reflections

Bumper Reflections

Also capturing the colors and the scale of the nets used to haul in the fish.

Netting

Netting

And finding small surprises if you look closely.

Puffin

Puffin

Bicycle Ready

Bicycle Ready

Finally appreciating the ruggedness of these ships that will soon be harvesting the salmon and other fish we love.

Salmon Transporter

Salmon Transporter

If you are fortunate to live near a fishing terminal, repair yard, or any other industrial site grab your camera and venture out to expand your creativity, as well as get a good walk.  I walked over three miles going up and down the docks.  It was refreshing being by the water, and watching the dock workers getting the ships in shape to go out to sea.

Share your photos with us from your exploration of industrial yards.  We would love to hear from you by commenting below, posting on our Facebook page, or sending us an email at getmoving@camerawalking.com.

Image | This entry was posted in Camera Walking, Creativity, Health and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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